Poetry in Spaces of Recovery

  I love the photo above because you can’t tell which hand is mine. Just like if I was standing together with these women in the Magdalene house, a safe place for women recovering from addiction and a life in the sex trade, (whether being trafficked or deploying their labor in instances of survival sex), Read more about Poetry in Spaces of Recovery[…]

The Birth of The Who Raised You? Podcast (Pt. 1)

I’m launching a podcast with my friend Karen Yang! (Video Below) Here’s a bit more about it: Who Raised You? Podcast is a kitchen table conversation between Karen (Jia Lian) Yang and Treasure Shields Redmond. Karen (she/her/they) is a 26 year-old bisexual 2nd generation Taiwanese American and a trained social worker-minister. Treasure (she/her/they) is a Read more about The Birth of The Who Raised You? Podcast (Pt. 1)[…]

Why A Black Woman Named Fannie Lou Hamer Matters Now More Than Ever (BONUS: Audio!)

Who was Fannie Lou Hamer? When one thinks of the millions of souls lost during the transatlantic slave trade, the missed potential immediately jumps to mind. All genocide robs us of the few geniuses that each culture produces.  At the beginning of the previous century the pernicious system named Jim Crow served as another sort Read more about Why A Black Woman Named Fannie Lou Hamer Matters Now More Than Ever (BONUS: Audio!)[…]

TFW You Realize You’re In Love With Your Captor

Sometimes I feel as if black folk’s self-worth teeters on the impetuous and hateful razor’s edge of racist white institutions. Like the protagonist in Beauty and the Beast, we’ve fallen in love with our captor, and somehow it has become our responsibility to humanize him. I have now lived through enough Oscar seasons to have Read more about TFW You Realize You’re In Love With Your Captor[…]

5 LESSONS TEACHERS CAN LEARN FROM THE LIFE OF FANNIE LOU HAMER: #5.The Writing Classroom is Uniquely Suited for Finding Undiscovered Gems

In part four of this series – “Our Classrooms Benefit from the Voices of our Most Marginalized Students” — I discussed (partly) how valuable the “marginalized voices” are in our classrooms. But really, I was speaking to the notion that the “marginalized” is the majority. I encourage you to check it out, especially in the Read more about 5 LESSONS TEACHERS CAN LEARN FROM THE LIFE OF FANNIE LOU HAMER: #5.The Writing Classroom is Uniquely Suited for Finding Undiscovered Gems[…]

The National Women’s March: Sisters, What Are You Willing To Destroy?

What follows are the remarks and the poem (“Oath: 1957”) I delivered on Saturday, January 21, 2017 at the St. Louis arm of the National Women’s March. When I was first asked to participate in the national women’s March, I declined because I thought it was just another example in the long line of examples of Read more about The National Women’s March: Sisters, What Are You Willing To Destroy?[…]

The Feminine Pronoun Series: Poetry. Pedagogy. Justice. (No. 30)

The tagline on my website for Feminine Pronoun Consultants, LLC is “Poetry. Pedagogy. Justice.” Those three powerful terms almost encompass my life/work philosophy. I say “almost” because Parenting is also a major part of my life’s work, as it were, and each of the terms inform each other and take turns being the star, while Read more about The Feminine Pronoun Series: Poetry. Pedagogy. Justice. (No. 30)[…]

The Feminine Pronoun Series No. 29: Old School #HipHop

I come to writing very honestly. Not only was my mother (rest in peace) a writer, but my father is a well-known poet and is currently poet laureate of his home town of East St. Louis, Illinois. The first time my writing truly became public was in the 1990s as a signed hip-hop artist to Read more about The Feminine Pronoun Series No. 29: Old School #HipHop[…]

The Feminine Pronoun Series #25: Ferguson is Everywhere

In this episode I reflect on the impact of Michael Brown’s murder and the Ferguson Uprising on my social justice advocacy, my writing, my teaching and my parenting. An extra special thanks is owed to the ARTIVISTS and to Reverend Sekou and the Holy Ghost for the incredible song, “We Comin” that appears toward the Read more about The Feminine Pronoun Series #25: Ferguson is Everywhere[…]

A Special FATHER’S DAY episode of the FEMININE PRONOUN Series (#19)

This is a “very special episode” of the FEMININE PRONOUN Series. Father’s Day is coming up and I am the daughter of a Poet. Eugene B. Redmond is a foundational Black Arts Movement poet, professor emeritus, cultural griot, and author of Drumvoices: The Mission of Afro American Poetry. I may be biased, but he is Read more about A Special FATHER’S DAY episode of the FEMININE PRONOUN Series (#19)[…]