Poetry in Spaces of Recovery

  I love the photo above because you can’t tell which hand is mine. Just like if I was standing together with these women in the Magdalene house, a safe place for women recovering from addiction and a life in the sex trade, (whether being trafficked or deploying their labor in instances of survival sex), Read more about Poetry in Spaces of Recovery[…]

Why A Black Woman Named Fannie Lou Hamer Matters Now More Than Ever (BONUS: Audio!)

Who was Fannie Lou Hamer? When one thinks of the millions of souls lost during the transatlantic slave trade, the missed potential immediately jumps to mind. All genocide robs us of the few geniuses that each culture produces.  At the beginning of the previous century the pernicious system named Jim Crow served as another sort Read more about Why A Black Woman Named Fannie Lou Hamer Matters Now More Than Ever (BONUS: Audio!)[…]

TFW You Realize You’re In Love With Your Captor

Sometimes I feel as if black folk’s self-worth teeters on the impetuous and hateful razor’s edge of racist white institutions. Like the protagonist in Beauty and the Beast, we’ve fallen in love with our captor, and somehow it has become our responsibility to humanize him. I have now lived through enough Oscar seasons to have Read more about TFW You Realize You’re In Love With Your Captor[…]

The Feminine Pronoun Series: “what It’s Like to be Bi-Municipal” (No. 36)

In 2009 I moved from Memphis to East St. Louis, Illinois.   A year later I moved across the river to St. Louis, Missouri. Two years after that I moved BACK across the river to Illinois where I now reside. Throughout this process, I built relationships in the arts, education and activist arena on both Read more about The Feminine Pronoun Series: “what It’s Like to be Bi-Municipal” (No. 36)[…]

The National Women’s March: Sisters, What Are You Willing To Destroy?

What follows are the remarks and the poem (“Oath: 1957”) I delivered on Saturday, January 21, 2017 at the St. Louis arm of the National Women’s March. When I was first asked to participate in the national women’s March, I declined because I thought it was just another example in the long line of examples of Read more about The National Women’s March: Sisters, What Are You Willing To Destroy?[…]

The TOP 5 Ways Faculty Can Support Student Activists

You want to jump up and shout because the students on your campus or the individuals in your community are calling out structural bias and even protesting, organizing, and making real headway against it.   Or you’re wondering what the hell is going on. Either way the young people need to be supported. Here are Read more about The TOP 5 Ways Faculty Can Support Student Activists[…]

Here’s Why Anger is the Ultimate Glow Up. Oh, and #StrikeForBlackLives

One of my favorite podcasts is Another Round, featuring a writer for Buzzfeed, Tracy Clayton and a writer for the Stephen Colbert Show, Heben Nigatu. The show features guests of color talking about a wide range of subjects, but with a keen eye on culture. One part drunken conversation and one part reportage, Another Round Read more about Here’s Why Anger is the Ultimate Glow Up. Oh, and #StrikeForBlackLives[…]

“Labor Pains” and the #StrikeForBlackLives

When Africans were enslaved, one popular narrative used to justify their enslavement, was that they were “lazy.” “If we don’t enslave them they won’t work” was one of the fears expressed pre-emancipation. In fact, black men found without a job could be remanded to forced labor post-slavery. In a strange psychic double bind, black bodies Read more about “Labor Pains” and the #StrikeForBlackLives[…]

Why Don’t We Crave to See the Families of the Murdered Policemen in Dallas Forgive Micah Johnson?

As the country continues to grapple with the racialized gun violence of the past weeks, several issues of comparison can be explored and discussed.   This is a thought experiment. I have taken an article titled, “Families of Charleston Shooting Victims: “We Forgive You” written by Inae Oh and published on MotherJones.com, and replaced the Read more about Why Don’t We Crave to See the Families of the Murdered Policemen in Dallas Forgive Micah Johnson?[…]

#StrikeForBlackLives: A Nationwide Job Walk-Off By Black Labor

  “Hamilton” isn’t the first play written by a writer of color that casts black and brown Americans in the roles of white Americans. 50 years earlier, Douglas Turner Ward wrote “A Day of Absence.” The play, with a role made famous by Ossie Davis, features a black cast playing white people in white face. Read more about #StrikeForBlackLives: A Nationwide Job Walk-Off By Black Labor[…]